Samsung Electronics set for best quarter in over two years on second-quarter smartphone boost

SEOUL Tech giant Samsung Electronics Co Ltd is poised to issue guidance for its best quarterly profit in more than two years, propelled by a surge in mobile earnings on the back of robust sales of its flagship Galaxy S7 smartphones. The South Korean giant will disclose its estimates for second-quarter earnings on Thursday, with analysts predicting a strong mobile division contributed to a 13 percent jump in operating profit from the same period a year earlier. The average forecast from a Thomson Reuters survey of 16 analysts tips Samsung to report April-June operating profit of 7.8 trillion won ($6.8 billion), the highest since an 8.5 trillion won profit in January-March of 2014. The mobile division of the world's top maker of smartphones and memory chips was likely its top earner for the second straight quarter with a 4.3 trillion won profit, according to the survey. Samsung surprised many with better-than-expected first-quarter earnings, and issued guidance for a further pickup in April-June."Galaxy S7 sales are better than expected in the first half, and the semiconductor business is also outperforming rivals," said KTB Asset Management's Lee Jin-woo. The fund manager estimated the firm's quarterly operating profit would also stay strong in both the third and fourth quarters at between 7 trillion won and 8 trillion won in each. Samsung's smartphone business had been squeezed before the start of this year between Apple Inc, at the high end of the market, and Chinese rivals like Huawei Technologies [HWT.UL] in the budget segment. But the Galaxy S7 has provided a catalyst for the earnings rebound, likely putting the mobile business on track to record its first annual profit growth in three years.Some analysts say Samsung shipped around 16 million Galaxy S7s in April-June, with a higher-priced curved-screen version outselling its flat-screen counterpart and boosting margins. Lackluster sales of offerings from rivals such as Apple and LG Electronics also helped reduced marketing expenses, they said. "While operating profit margins for the mobile phone business will decline in the third and fourth quarters as the Galaxy S7 effect fades, operating profit will continue to grow on an annual basis," Korea Investment & Securities said in a report. As its smartphones thrive, Samsung's chip business - last year's key profit driver - probably saw quarterly profit sink to its lowest in nearly two years due to weak demand from makers of other smartphones and personal computers. But signs of some price recovery for DRAM chips starting last month and Samsung's dominance in the premium solid-state disc drive market with its 3D NAND chip production technology suggest a pickup in coming months, analysts said. (Reporting by Se Young Lee; Editing by Tony Munroe and Kenneth Maxwell) Read more

Google beats children's web privacy appeal, Viacom to face one claim

Google and Viacom on Monday defeated an appeal in a nationwide class action lawsuit by parents who claimed the companies illegally tracked the online activity of children under the age of 13 who watched videos and played video games on Nickelodeon's website.By a 3-0 vote, the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Philadelphia said Google, a unit of Alphabet Inc, and Viacom Inc were not liable under several federal and state laws for planting "cookies" on boys' and girls' computers, to gather data that advertisers could use to send targeted ads.The court also revived one state law privacy claim against Viacom, claiming that it promised on the Nick.com website not to collect children's personal information, but did so anyway.Monday's decision largely upheld a January 2015 ruling by U.S. District Judge Stanley Chesler in Newark, New Jersey. It returned the surviving claim to him.Jay Barnes, a lawyer for the parents, declined to comment.Viacom spokesman Jeremy Zweig said the company is pleased with the dismissals and confident it will prevail on the remaining claim. "Nickelodeon is proud of its record on children's privacy issues and strongly committed to the best practices in the industry," he added. Google did not immediately respond to a request for comment.Monday's decision is a fresh setback for computer users, after the same appeals court last November 10 said Google was not liable under federal privacy laws for bypassing cookie blockers on Apple Inc's Safari browser and Microsoft Corp's Internet Explorer browser.Circuit Judge Julio Fuentes, who wrote both decisions, said that ruling doomed many of the parents' claims against Mountain View, California-based Google and New York-based Viacom. He also rejected the parents' claims under the Video Privacy Protection Act, a 1988 law adopted a year after a newspaper wrote about movies rented by failed Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork, based on a list provided by a video store.Fuentes said the law was meant to thwart the collection of data to help monitor people's video-watching behavior.He said Congress, despite amending the law in 2013, never updated it to cover the collection of data such as users' IP addresses, browser settings and operating settings, and reflect a "contemporary understanding" of Internet privacy. "Some disclosures predicated on new technology, such as the dissemination of precise GPS coordinates or customer ID numbers, may suffice," Fuentes wrote. "But others--including the kinds of disclosures described by the plaintiffs here--are simply too far afield from the circumstances that motivated the act's passage to trigger liability."The revived privacy claim accused Viacom of reneging on a promise on Nick.com that said: "HEY GROWN-UPS: We don't collect ANY personal information about your kids. Which means we couldn't share it even if we wanted to!"Fuentes said a reasonable jury might find Viacom liable for "intrusion upon seclusion" if it found its alleged privacy intrusion "highly offensive to the ordinary reasonable man."The case is In re: Nickelodeon Consumer Privacy Litigation, 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, No. 15-1441. (Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York; Editing by David Gregorio; Editing by David Gregorio) Read more

List All Containers on Docker

Docker is a piece of software that allows you to run a complete filesystem in its own environment like a virtual machine by using containers to wrap up the environment. It will contain all of this together to run code, runtime, system tools, and system libraries, which is everything you need to run your own server.It is different in the architecture of virtual machines as all of the containers share the same kernel as the other containers but all other dependencies can run in isolation.This uses a config file to add all the dependencies you need on your server for your application to run correctly, for example, if your application needs a certain version of PHP to run, then creating a Docker environment will allow you to easily share the same environment with all developers on the project. If all developers are creating the application on the exact same environment as the live system will be on, it will make testing a lot easier allowing deployment to happen much faster and easier.Learn More About Using DockerList All ContainersThe below command will show all the current containers you have on Docker.docker psTo see all the current containers including those that aren't running you need to use the -l flag.docker ps -lOnce you have a list of all the containers you can attach to a certain container by using the container ID you get back from the list.docker attach {CONTAINERID} Read more

Einstein 2.0: gravitational waves detected for a second time

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.,  The ground-breaking detection of gravitational waves, ripples in space and time postulated by Albert Einstein 100 years ago, that was announced in February was no fluke. Scientists said on Wednesday that they have spotted them for a second time.The researchers said they detected gravitational waves that washed over Earth after two distant black holes spiraled toward each other and merged into a single, larger abyss 1.4 billion years ago. That long-ago violent collision set off reverberations through spacetime, a fusion of the concepts of time and three-dimensional space.These gravitational waves were observed by twin observatories in the United States late on Dec. 25, 2015 (early on Dec. 26 GMT). The detectors are located in Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington.The first detection of gravitational waves was made in September and announced on Feb. 11. It created a scientific sensation and was a benchmark in physics and astronomy, transforming a quirky implication of Einstein's 1916 theory of gravity into the realm of observational astronomy.The waves detected in September and December both were triggered by the merger of black holes, which are regions so dense with matter that not even photons of light can escape the gravitational sinkholes they produce in space. The merging black holes that set space ringing in December were much smaller than the first pair, demonstrating the sensitivity of the recently upgraded Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, or LIGO, facilities."We are starting to get a glimpse of the kind of new astrophysical information that can only come from gravitational-wave detectors," said Massachusetts Institute of Technology researcher David Shoemaker. The black holes that triggered the newly detected gravitational waves were eight and 14 times more massive than the sun, respectively, before merging into a single, spinning black hole about 21 times more massive than the sun. The equivalent of one sun's worth of mass was transformed into gravitational energy.The Louisiana site detected the waves first and the Washington state detector picked up the signal 1.1 milliseconds later. Scientists can use the timing difference to calculate a rough idea of where the black holes merger occurred. Scientists say the second detection confirms that pairs of black holes are relatively common.  "Now that we are able to detect gravitational waves, they are going to be a phenomenal source of new information about our galaxy and an entirely new channel for discoveries about the universe," Pennsylvania State University astrophysicist Chad Hanna said.The research, presented at the American Astronomical Society meeting in San Diego, will be published in the journal Physical Review Letters. (Reporting by Irene Klotz; Editing by Will Dunham) Read more

Private company wants U.S. clearance to fly to the moon

WASHINGTON U.S. government agencies are working on temporary rules to allow a private company to land a spacecraft on the moon next year, while Congress weighs a more permanent legal framework to govern future commercial missions to the moon, Mars and other destinations beyond Earth's orbit, officials said.Plans by private companies to land spacecraft on the moon or launch them out of Earth's orbit face legal obstacles because the United States has not put in place regulations to govern space activities, industry and government officials said."We do not have formal authority today to deal with what happens on orbit or on other planetary terrestrial bodies. That’s the issue that we’re wrestling with,” said George Nield, head of the Federal Aviation Administration’s Office of Commercial Space Transportation.“What is being looked at right now is a Band-Aid fix because the system is broken,” Nield said at an American Bar Association space law forum in Washington on Wednesday. A 1967 international treaty obliges the United States and other signatories to authorize and supervise space activities by its non-government entities. But no U.S. agency has authority to regulate commercial space activities outside of rocket launches, spacecraft re-entries into the atmosphere and operations of telecommunications and remote sensing satellites in Earth orbit.The issue is coming to a head in part because of a request by Florida-based Moon Express for permission from the U.S. government to land a spacecraft on the moon in 2017. So far, only government agencies have flown satellites beyond Earth’s orbit. “No commercial company has ever asked to go outside of Earth orbit and go elsewhere before. We’re a pathfinder out of necessity,” Moon Express Chief Executive Bob Richards said in an interview on Monday.Richards and Nield declined to comment on what specifically Moon Express is proposing. Other countries are moving faster to establish rules for space launches in compliance with international treaties. Luxembourg last week announced it was partnering with two U.S. companies interested in mining asteroids and set aside 200 million euros to woo space firms to relocate. The United Arab Emirates also intends to serve as a commercial space haven.“We don’t want to create the environment where there’s a competitive advantage for payloads to go overseas,” said space attorney Michael Gold, who chairs the FAA’s commercial space advisory panel. (Reporting by Irene Klotz; Editing by Bill Trott) Read more

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